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Executive Development Facilitator



Dr. Torrie Kalm, PsyD, CPD

September 2023


In the midst of my busy week delving into the coaching industry, I've stumbled upon a topic that's been on my mind lately: the term "Life Coach." And, to be honest, I'm not a fan. Here's why.


These days, it seems like everyone considers themselves a life coach. They might have knowledge in a few areas, but they're far from being masters of the craft. My mission here is to help people distinguish between individuals who are knowledgeable of much, masters of nothing and professionally trained coaches. Don't get me wrong; the coaching industry offers a wide range of specializations—financial, business, health, wellness, executive development and more. However, the real question is, how qualified are these individuals to guide you on your journey?


Throughout my exploration, I've noticed that many self-proclaimed coaches have chosen the path of aimless wandering, traversing the country without a clear purpose. While their journeys may have been intriguing and transformative on a personal level, they hardly qualify them as credible coaches. Now, I understand this might ruffle some feathers, but it's a truth we need to acknowledge.


Unlike some professions that mandate specific educational backgrounds, there are no stringent laws governing the qualifications of "Life Coaches." This makes it crucial for you, as someone seeking guidance, to exercise caution when selecting a coach if you want to maximize the return on your investment.


Personally, I hold a Doctorate in Psychology, Health, and Wellness, Human Services. Moreover, I've undergone additional coach training to continuously enhance my skill set and stay updated on the latest research and strategies. I'm not saying you need a doctoral degree to be a coach, but when choosing one, it's wise to inquire about their educational background and specialized training in the area you're interested in. If their response resembles "social media warrior" or "search engine guru," it's a sign to proceed with caution.


Fun fact: According to the 2020 ICF Global Coaching Study, a whopping 85% of coaches are accredited or approved by professional coaching organizations. There are incredibly qualified and exceptional coaches out there; the key is to know who you're hiring, my friends!


So, in your journey through the coaching industry, remember to look beyond the buzzwords and claims. Seek those who have put in the time and effort to become true experts in their field. Your journey deserves nothing less.


I leave you with this thought…

What prevents you from doing things differently? What's getting in the way?



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